Dee (dulcineah1) wrote in frith_devotion,
Dee
dulcineah1
frith_devotion

more fic

This story was written by me and my friend, who wants to be known as Awesome Anonymous Person. It's, well, Victorian. Think Frith in 1800s England, in the Jane Austen era.



Dear Madam,

It has come to my attention that during the festivities held at your estate Thursday last, I absentmindedly left a possession of mine. If you do not recall, the weather was quite undesirable that evening, so I thought it wise to carry my umbrella. It seems that while I was so joyously engaged in the evening's entertainment, the whereabouts of my umbrella escaped me. Therefore, if it does not impose too much upon you, I would hope it be returned. It should not be of much trouble to locate, as it bears my initials -- F.W.C.-- on the handle. I send along my sincerest gratitude in advance.

F. W. Crane



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Dear Sir,

Thank you most kindly for your courteous note and for your good wishes. I am pleased to hear that you enjoyed last Thursday's festivities. It was a pleasure to meet you, and I must say I enjoyed our spirited discussion on the values and morals of our society. It was very kind of you to compliment my virtues, and I am nothing but flattered that a man of your stature would think that highly of me.

Your umbrella is set aside in a safe place. Please free to come by and retrieve it the next time you are in the area.

L. M. Sternin



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Dear Madam,

I wish to thank you for your hospitality upon my arrival on your estate. As much as I have in the past enjoyed the lavish festivities held therein, I find it much more to my liking when not surrounded by the local gentry. I'm not particularly accustomed to being received by one of your family and not restricting my comments to the weather or the latest gossip passed by my ear. Indeed it seems as though my initial opinions concerning your household and its occupants were quite inaccurate, and I send you my most genuine apology.

It has also been passed on to me, by a mutual acquaintance, that we shall both be attending the Williams' party. I confess that upon hearing of your attendance there, I further anticipate its approach.

F. W. Crane



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Dear Sir,

I must confess to holding a certain fondness for those "lavish festivities" you spoke of in your last letter. While your visit last week was very enjoyable, I must say I do love music and dancing, and other activities that are rarely entertained outside of the extravagant galas held. Although I do agree with you that it is also very pleasant to meet in a more casual atmosphere and without such a large crowd. I am afraid that I am not much of a social butterfly.

I must also apologize for my remarks regarding your dancing. You are, I must say, a splendid dancer, and did not step on my feet once. Thank you for a lovely evening.

L. M. Sternin



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Dear Madam,

Your fondness for such activities held at "extravagant galas" was quite apparent at our last meeting. Though it seems I do not hold the same regard for your social abilities. I found you to be quite charming underneath the conservative facade, which seemed to falter under the influence of the famous amount of alcohol associated with Williams' parties. The remarks regarding my dancing were surely a result of that, as well. Or at least I should like to entertain the idea to retain my pride.

If your countenance should bless such similar galas I often attend, I should enjoy them much more, I am certain. But at present I shall have to keep the more casual atmosphere as my preference.

F. W. Crane




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Dear Sir,

I am flattered to hear that you enjoyed my company at the Williams' party last weekend. You were quite right when you told me that the punch would be quite unlike anything I had ever tasted, although you neglected to inform me that I would be indisposed for the majority of the following day. I do apologize for not being able to come down when you kindly came by for a visit, although I suspect that you weren't feeling any better than I was.

On a happier topic, my family is giving a small dinner this coming Friday in honor of my parents' twenty year wedding anniversary. A number of our friends will be coming, and I was hoping that you might be among them. Please let me know as soon as possible, as our chef must know how many people will be attending by the day after next.

L. M. Sternin



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Dear Madam,

You are indeed forgiven for not receiving my call upon your house, for I was quite certain of the reason forbidding you to do so. You are correct in your diagnosis of my illness that afternoon, though it was but a mere side effect of the lovely evening prior.

I would be most honored to be one of the guests at your parents' celebration of marriage. I haven't had the opportunity to engage in conversation with the highly esteemed couple as much as I have their daughter. If they are the slightest bit as intriguing as she, the evening will not fail to please.

F. W. Crane



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Dear Mr. Crane,

My family and I wish to thank your for your presence at the dinner party given last Friday for my parents wedding anniversary. My parents were very touched and grateful for your thoughtful gift, and were happy you were able to attend. As for myself, I enjoyed your company and was very intrigued regarding your remarks on this Dr. Freud in Vienna. I admit that he does seem to be a very intelligent man, although I remain convinced that his theories are nothing more than equine excrement. In any instance, I thoroughly enjoyed our debate and look forward to resuming it when we meet again.

Miss Sternin



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Dear Miss Sternin,

I am pleased to hear your parents thought of my gift and presence so fondly. I am more pleased to know that you do not feel I am a burden, as my visits and letters have become more frequent. Regarding Dr. Freud, I was made very aware that you don't share my feelings concerning his theories. I was quite surprised that you expressed your opinion so openly, something rare among most of your breed. Accompanying the surprise was, of course, intrigue, and I wish to continue our debate as you do.

Mr. Crane


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Dear Mr. Crane,

I must say that it is refreshing to find a man who is not intimidated by the slightest hint of intelligence in a lady. Most of the gentlemen of my acquaintance, while fine, decent people, tend to believe that those of the female gender are gentle and delicate creatures, and should be treated as such. I confess that I enjoy our frequent exchanges of opinions, despite my claims to the contrary, and appreciate your acknowledgment of my superior intelligence. However, I regret to state that as much as I appreciate your excellent debating skills, I cannot see myself agreeing with you regarding Dr. Freud any time in the future.

Miss Sternin



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Dear Miss Sternin,

I confess your superior intelligence is certainly intimidating to those beneath it, making it all the more fortunate that I am at such ease during our discourse.

I have been made aware that I have yet to extend an invitation for your attendance at a party at my parents' estate Saturday next. I fear my father's guests and I do not often agree, so it would be of great gratitude on my behalf if you should be there. I should be able to then continue our discussion, and afterward, if you wouldn't be averse to the notion, I thought you might join me at the pianoforte as I demonstrate my recent mastery of a particularly difficult concerto. I hope to hear that you will be present, for I have grown fond your company.

Mr. Crane



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Dear Mr. Crane,

I am very honored by your invitation to your gala next Saturday, and would be delighted to attend. I am looking forward to your musical performance, and am sure that you will give a marvelous rendition. I have heard many enthusiastic accounts of your piano performances, and must admit that have also grown fond of your company.

In the past few weeks, I confess that I have come to find that I increasingly look forward to our letters and meetings. You possess the ability to make me laugh, which is not a usual quality in most men I know, and perhaps it is for this reason that I have developed a particular fondness for you. I look forward to seeing you on Saturday.

Miss Sternin



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Dear Miss Sternin,

It pains me a great deal to inform you that I shall not be in attendance at your house within the fortnight. For I must away for that duration on a matter too delicate to reveal at this time, though you shall soon learn of its significance. Our correspondance shall be continued, of course, and I have enclosed my current address. Receiving your letters will be of much comfort while I am not permitted to call upon you. I confess I have become not only accustomed to your company, but extremely fond of it, as well. I cannot express to what extent the challenge of going without it shall be.

Mr. Crane



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Dear Mr. Crane,

I am sorry to hear that I must wait several weeks for your next visit. I hope that nothing I said last Saturday prompted this action. If it did not, I apologize for being presumptuous, and if it did, I apologize for anything I might have said or done to offend you. I want to thank you for inviting me to last Saturday's party, as well as for the marvelous piano performance that evening. I will miss you while you are gone, and eagerly look forward to your return.

On second thought, I don't regret any of my actions on Saturday. I can honestly say that I have never enjoyed a party more, and if given the opportunity to experience it again, I would not change anything that happened. Not one bit. I am only sorry if I upset you in any way. I have become so fond of you that offending you is the last thing I would ever intentionally do.

Miss Sternin


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Dear Miss Sternin,

While I don't feel you need to apologize for being presumptuous, the reason for my sudden departure is quite contrary to your belief. I assure you that no offense was made on your part. It happens that I held myself accountable for particular events at our last meeting, though I confess I share your lack of regret for their occurance.

Your eagerness at my return can in no way match mine, for it seems much too far away. As it happens, my business looks to be resolved sooner than I had anticipated, and I shall be returning a few days prior to my initial estimate. I will make calling upon your house the first of my duties upon my return.

Mr. Crane


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Dear Frasier,

I fear that I am still too astounded to say much in this letter. At times I think it has all been a dream, but when I see the ring on my hand I can believe that it is real. It has been a mere half an hour since your departure, and yet I miss you already. It seems an eternity until I am to see you again, and I am counting the hours until we are reunited.

Words cannot express how happy I am at the prospect of becoming your wife. And to think that none of this should have happened if you had not left your umbrella at my house the first time we met! I shall always be grateful to the rain, for if the weather had been fine we might not have met again, and I would not be as blissfully happy as I am today. Please write soon. I miss you terribly.

Lilith


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My dearest,

A cannot convey to you the feeling I have at the present, as I am not sure myself of its nature. I have not a physical reminder such as yours that we are betrothed, yet I have no need for it. In my heart and mind I have no doubt that you are, and will evermore be mine. It seems this correspondance no longer satisfies my longing for you, and I anticipate my next visit more than ever.

You cherish the rain for bringing us together, but I do not. For you see, my dear, it was only inevitable that I write you. That I call upon you. That I ask for your hand. For that first time we met, and with animosity at first, you ignited a part of me I had hitherto no knowledge of existing. It is with the same intensity that it burns for you now as it did then, and my judgement tells me it shall not soon cease.

Frasier


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My dear Frasier,

I am currently waiting to see you again at our engagement party tonight, and while I always enjoy visiting with our friends, there is a part of me that wishes that there would be no party and no friends, with just the two of us together by the fire. I long to hear your voice in my ear, and to feel your strong arms around me. When you are with me, I feel as if nothing could go wrong. You are the man I love, and you are to be my husband. I wish it possible to turn forward time until we are married, and we belong to each other forever.

As for tonight, I do hope we have the opportunity to steal away together for at least a few minutes. If you were to express a desire to view a particular book in my father's library, I am certain we could find a few moments alone together. I am counting the minutes until we are together again.

Lilith


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My beloved,

It has been but a few hours since you left my sight, though when I close my eyes I see nothing but your lovely countenance. I cannot anticipate enough the time when I open them and you are present to meet my gaze. Our wedding is a few months still, yet I permit myself to think of that day. When you shall officially be declared mine. When we shall no longer separated.

The engagement party provided me the opportunity to see you again, my love, but I do wish it had not left me so empty upon your departure. Though that is what I confess I do feel. Empty. I suppose this feeling shall haunt me whenever you are away from my side. This only makes me long for our marriage all the more, as I know that when we are announced as united in matrimony, it will be the happiest I shall ever be.

Frasier


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My dear Frasier,

I dreamt of our wedding last night, and words cannot begin to describe my joy when we were pronounced man and wife and you took me into your arms and kissed me, for the first time, as my husband. It was a beautiful wedding, I am sure, but I'm afraid I do not recall much of it from my dream, as all I could see was you. I am certain that shall be the case in our real wedding, and I do admit that it makes planning the details seem irrelevant. It doesn't matter to me whether my veil shall go to my shoulders or to my knees, or whether the rose petals will be red or white. All that is important to me is that you will be the one waiting there for me, and that we will pledge our lives together.

I feel that I am the luckiest woman in the world. I love you more than words can possibly say, and I look forward to when my dream becomes reality, and you are forever at my side.

Lilith


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My dearest Lilith,

Forgive my hand in this, for the pen trembles so in haste. It is a few minutes yet until we are united, and I am pressed to write you of my feelings at present. I fear it shall only be a poor attempt, however, as words cannot express how violently my heart beats. Has the day really come that you and I shall be husband and wife? I cannot believe my good fortune, nor do I believe I deserve it. I shall, however, endeavor to make you as filled with joy as I am at this moment.

I do so wish I could tell you this directly, but such traditions forbid it. I shall instead leave this in the care of your mother, who shall deliver these -- my last words to you as your intended.

Frasier

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My beloved Frasier,

Although we have been married for over ten years, I still miss you profoundly whenever I am parted for you, even if it is merely for a matter of days. We are all well at home--the children keep me occupied throughout the day, but the house is simply not the same without you. At night I lie awake and long to feel your arms about me, but I find solace in the knowledge that you will soon be back by my side. The children miss you as much as I do--not a day goes by when Frederick does not ask me when his father will return. I hope that your business is going well, and that you will soon return home to me.

As I write this letter, I look out the window into the night sky, and it is a source of comfort to me that the same stars I see are shining down on you. I am thankful every day to whatever force that brought us together and enabled me to be as fortunate as to be your wife. The last ten years have been happier than I could have ever dreamt, and I eagerly anticipate spending the rest of my life with you.

Lilith
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